Category Archives: UX advice

Make paper prototypes.

Make paper prototypes.

A prototype is an early version of a design which precedes full-scale production. Interface designers use paper prototypes to make websites better. Paper prototyping is flexible, and allows for quick and easy fixes to interface problems. Problems identified at this early stage are easy and fast to correct. Problems not detected until mockups or coding have begun are much […]

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Engage the user’s emotions.

Engage the user’s emotions.

Design that engages our emotions is memorable. Pleasurable design makes us happy. It brings us back again and again, and prompts us to share with others. Emotional design builds human connections to our content. The goal is to make users feel like there’s a person rather than a machine on the other end. Further Study Pleasure, Flow, […]

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Create and use a style guide.

Create and use a style guide.

A style guide is a tool that outlines the styles a brand will use. These styles can be anything from logo, color and typeface usage, to editorial voice, to the very specific ways that interface elements will be designed. Style guides help a website maintain a consistent user experience as the site is updated or […]

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Use color to create meaning.

Use color to create meaning.

Visual designers should have a basic understanding of how color affects us. Color evokes emotional responses. It has sociological meanings. And when a single color is used repeatedly through a website to mean essentially the same thing, it aids usability. Users learn quickly what it means when they see an orange button again, or a […]

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Create a clear visual hierarchy.

Create a clear visual hierarchy.

Visual hierarchy is an arrangement of text and images on the page that unmistakably tells us what’s most important. More important elements are more prominent, so we look at them first. Parts of a whole are displayed as nested under a common headline. The goal is to lead the eye through the page by crafting the element […]

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Omit needless words.

Omit needless words.

Get rid of half the words on each page, then get rid of half of what’s left. – Steve Krug Your goal is to get users to read your important message. Their goal is different. Usually they want to avoid reading much. So keep your message short, useful, unmissable, and jargon-free. Skip the welcomes and […]

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Display complex data graphically.

Display complex data graphically.

Data can be dry and hard to comprehend when it’s just spit out onto a page, no matter how nicely you style your tables. Recently, designers have found many ways to make data more visual—and often even beautiful. Display complex data graphically instead of simply with numbers. It’s even better when it’s interactive. Users can […]

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